Sacred Sites Are Not For Sale

“My mother was told by my great-grandmother, ‘You don’t go to the rim without a serious reason. You don’t go there just to look. You go there with your corn pollen to pray to the Holy Beings.'” –Renae Yellowhorse of Save the Confluence 

The Smithsonian Magazine article in March 2015 issue “Who Can Save the Grand Canyon?” by David Roberts follows Delores Wilson [pictured] & Renae Yellowhorse, key Navajo members of Save the Confluence, a grassroots movement to stop the Escalade development which threatens to cut a gondola tramway into the Grand Canyon and take up to 10,000 visitors per day to the confluence of the Little Colorado and Colorado rivers, with hotels, gift shops & restaurants.

After just visiting the Grand Canyon, reading this incredible article highlighting the sacredness of the canyon, and watching the sun rise over it in complete silence, I’m convinced this is the wrong choice, despite the promise of jobs for Native people by the developer. Even though I do not have all the answers and am grossly uninformed about the experiences of Native people living on reservations, I feel deeply that there are better ways to create economic sustainability for indigenous people that do not involve scarring 200 million years of the Earth’s creation and ancestors’ spirits.

Please learn more and help stop this project before it starts!  #stoptheescalade #disneyfication #irresponsible #sacredsitesnotforsale #grandcanyon #navajo #zuni #hopi #reservations #protecttheconfluence #fightlikeawoman 

[Photo credit: Bill Hatcher]

My partner and I watching the sun rise over the Grand Canyon at Yaki Point during our Southwest Road Trip. So grateful that we read the Smithsonian Magazine article before going, to better inform our visit and connect to the deep spirituality of the canyon.
My partner and I watching the sun rise over the Grand Canyon at Yaki Point during our Southwest Road Trip. So grateful that we read the Smithsonian Magazine article before going, to better inform our visit and connect to the deep spirituality of the canyon.

 

Leave a Reply